Skip to main content

Pay by productivity

I have often said that people should be selected and rewarded based on productivity, not mere experience. In fact, this belief forms the basis of the 'pay by productivity' contract system we use in the services division of Crystal Ball.

But today I'm not going to talk about how we do things at Crystal Ball. Instead, let me just point you to this very cool article on incentivizing, measuring and rewarding productivity.

Quoting:

Software defect measurements are frequently attributed to individual developers, but the development environment often conspires against individual developers and makes it impossible to write defect-free code. Instead of charting errors by developer, a systematic effort to provide developers with immediate testing feedback, along with a root cause analysis of remaining defects, is much more effective at reducing the overall software defect rate.

By aggregating defect counts into an informational measurement, and hiding individual performance measurements, it becomes easier to address the root causes of defects. If an entire development team, testers and developers alike, feel responsible for the defect count, then testers will tend to become involved earlier and provide more timely and useful feedback to developers. Defects caused by code integration will become everyone’s problem, not just the unlucky person who wrote the last bit of code.


It flies in the face of conventional wisdom to suggest that the most effective way to avoid the pitfalls of measurements is to use measurements that are outside the personal control of the individual being measured. But conventional wisdom is misleading. Instead of making sure that people are measured within their span of control, it is more effective to measure people one level above their span of control. This is the best way to encourage teamwork, collaboration, and global, rather than local, optimization.


Read the original article

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Splitting User Stories vs. Rally's "split" feature (that has nothing to do with it!)

I recently came across a "split" feature in the popular Agile tool Rally that they recommend to handle unfinished work. Manage Unfinished Work - Split user stories http://www.rallydev.com/help/manage-unfinished-work Screenshot http://www.rallydev.com/help/sites/default/files/multimedia/Screen%20Shot%202012-03-02%20at%2011.17.11%20AM.png UPDATE: The above links don’t work anymore (apparently since CA acquired Rally). Rather than change the links (because I’m not sure if the new links correspond to the old articles I was responding to), I’m just going to share the new links: https://help.rallydev.com/manage-unfinished-work#split Below are my observations on the "Split" feature in Rally (following by a few excellent articles on Splitting User Stories): This has numerous problems: 1. Nothing to do with Splitting User Stories It has nothing to do with "Splitting a User Story" which is an advanced but fairly well-understood field in Agile, and a tool for Product Managers…

The Wise & Persistent (a.k.a. Agile) Entrepreneur

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, but wiser people so full of doubts."
Bertrand Russell
The Dunning-Kruger effect explains the pervasive and perverse phenomenon where people with less competence rate their ability higher than do people who are relatively more competent.

The successful pursuit of any major goal in life requires many things including the much overrated Luck. In my mind, two qualities stand head and shoulders above everything else as absolutely essential to success:

Your ability to LearnYour Persistence
I've previously discussed how to improve your ability to learn.

Today I want to share with my fellow entrepreneurs my thoughts on persistence.

I'm sure you had enough lessons of persistence knocked into your head. And it may even be getting to a point where the word starts to lose its meaning. But the thing is, persistence will lead you to success only if you have a proportional ability to learn…

Gaand Mein Danda

If you don't know Hindi, you probably won't relate to it.

Turns out the youth culture in India is alive and well, and quite creative too.
Here's a hilarious- and a very melodious song, Gaand Mein Danda, from "Bodhi Tree", a student band from XLRI Jamshedpur.

Read along with the lyrics for total enjoyment ;)

Some of their other hits include:
- Sabka Katega
- Too Many Potatoes
- XL Ki Kudiyan

Here's some more on the topic if you're intrigued:
Sutta mil gaya
Swear word mil gaya